The Friday Five – Our Weekly Urban Mobility & Sustainability Blog

Leafy Greens

Nissan and Uber have signed a deal to support the introduction of 2,000 all-electric Nissan LEAFs for drivers who use the Uber app. This deal will help to deliver Uber’s vision for every car on the app in the capital – around 45,000 drivers – to be fully electric from 2025. The vehicles can travel up to 168 miles on a single charge and are manufactured in Sunderland, and will be offered to drivers as part of Uber’s Clean Air Plan.

Customers without Cars

IKEA is building a large store in Vienna with no parking spaces. The concept focuses on the current megatrends and takes into account the dramatically changing shopping behavior, as well as a new form of car-less mobility. The whole store is orientated toward pedestrians, cyclists and people who come by subway, which takes you right to the door. Delivery? Everything too big to carry will be delivered within 24 hours by an electric van.

You Are What You Wear

As public pressure on the fashion industry to reduce its waste and carbon footprint grows, spending on sustainability is rising. However, despite committed dollars from the fashion industry, the investment so far may only be a pittance of what’s needed to drive transformative change. The fashion industry might need to invest up to $30 billion per year on sustainability in order to overcome current lack of resourcefulness.

Shoulda Wooda Coulda

Architects, construction workers and environmentalists are all the rage over a new building material they say could substantially reduce greenhouse gases in the building sector, slash the waste, pollution, and costs associated with construction, and create a more physically, psychologically, and aesthetically healthy built environment. The material? Good old wood.

Royal Sustainability

Prince Charles took to the stage at the World Economic Forum in Davos to emphasise the importance of combatting climate change, specifically at business and financial level. Prince Charles called for ‘the reallocation of capital toward more responsible, sustainable business practices.’

“Global warming, climate change and the devastating loss of biodiversity are the greatest threats humanity has ever faced,” the future King of Britain said.

Tally-Ho fine Sir.